The Louvre, Paris / by Sagar Mukala

 Night view of Louvre pyramid

Night view of Louvre pyramid

For many people all over the world, a visit to the Louvre is a major bucket list item during a trip to Paris. The most-visited museum in the world is also one of the largest—the total length of the facade measures nearly two miles—and one of the richest in artistic treasures (the Louvre exhibits 38,000 works and has an additional 422,000 in storage). Louis XIV was the last king to use the Louvre as a royal residence—he moved his court to Versailles in 1682. In 1793, during the French Revolution, the Musée Central des Arts opened to the public in the Grande Galerie. Napoleon Bonaparte and Napoleon III both added to the Louvre, enhancing their own prestige. It wasn’t until 1993, however, that the whole building was used as a museum for the first time. The Mona Lisa may be the Louvre’s most famous painting, but many people don’t realize that the museum’s largest painting is actually in the same room. The Wedding Feast at Cana by Venetian Renaissance master Veronese is sometimes mistaken for the Last Supper, but actually depicts Christ’s first miracle of transforming water to wine. Don't forget to checkout my video compilation of Paris below.

 

Until next time,

Sagar